Skip to main content

Mike Bursell

Over at Enarx, we’re preparing for another release. They’re coming every four weeks now, and we’re getting into a good rhythm. Thanks to all contributors, and also those working on streamlining the release process. It’s a complex project with lots of dependencies – some internal, and some external – and we’re still feeling our way about how best to manage it all. One thing that you will be starting to see in our documentation, and which we intend to formalise in coming releases, is support for particular languages. I don’t mean human languages (though translations of Enarx documentation into different languages, to support as diverse a community as we can, is definitely of interest), but programming languages.

Source: Alice, Eve and Bob – a security blog

Link: https://aliceevebob.com/2022/04/12/webassembly-the-importance-of-languages/

Mike Bursell

Title: Building an open company around an open source project
Author: Mike Bursell
Date: March 29, 2022

Enarx is an open source security project in Confidential Computing. About 2 years after its inception, we decided to start a company around it – and we wanted to make the company open, too. What were the challenges, and how did we address them? How to balance community growth against product development? Should design and development stay in the open? How should we manage issues, PRs, documentation?

We made some mistakes along the way, we’ve done some things right, and we’re still learning, but come along to understand and join us on our journey.

Source: Open Source 101 2022

Link: https://opensource101.com/sessions/building-an-open-company-around-an-open-source-project/

Mike Bursell

A fair amount of the development for this release has been in functionality which won’t be visible to most users, including a major rewrite of the TEE/host interface component that we call sallyport. You will, however, notice that TLS support has been added to network connections from applications within the Keep. This is transparent to the application, so “Where does the certificate come from?” I hear you ask. The answer to that is from the attestation service that’s also part of this release. We’ll be talking more about that in further releases and articles, but key to the approach we’re taking is that interactions with the service (we call it the “Steward”) is pretty much transparent to users and applications.

Source: Alice, Eve and Bob – a security blog

Link: https://aliceevebob.com/2022/03/16/enarx-0-3-0-chittorgarh-fort/

Nick Vidal

Profian believes in growing the WebAssembly ecosystem. Our goal is to connect with like-minded individuals, companies, open source projects, and organizations to grow the WebAssembly ecosystem, to explore the limits of wasm-native applications, and to work together with the community to build the next wave of Cloud Computing!

Source: Profian's Blog

Link: https://blog.profian.com/profian-and-the-webassembly/