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  • Austin
  • Jarkko
  • Harald
  • Mike
  • Nathaniel
  • Nick
  • Paul

Agenda

Community 2022-Q1 OKRs​

  • Reach 500 GitHub stars (currently approaching 400);
  • Reach 250 Twitter followers (currently > 200);
  • Reach 150 LinkedIn followers (currently > 100);
  • Publish 12 demos + 12 tutorials (4 videos);
  • Weekly blog posts;
  • Presence at 3 conferences;
  • Receive 8 fellowship guests;

Community Metrics​

CCC​

  • TAC Tech Talk about Confidential Computing Fellowship (LFX leadership invited);
  • Involved in publishing quarterly newsletter;
  • Get involved in the Confidential Computing Developer Summit;
  • Get involved with the Website revamp.

Wasm Builders​

  • Enarx interns playing major role publishing tutorials;
  • Welcome post approved (getting quotes);
  • Co-participation at events (Wasm Days, WebAssembly Live, WebAssembly Summit).

Fellowship​

Events​

  • FOSDEM (2 talks approved)
  • OC3 (awaiting results)
  • SCALE (awaiting results)
  • RightsCon (CFP deadline: 20 January)
  • CN Wasm Days (CFP deadline: 28 February)
  • CN SecurityCon (CFP deadline: 14 February)

Nick Vidal

Metrics are important to understand and grow a healthy open source community. These metrics may be related to the code base (number of issues, pull requests, etc), documentation (number of tutorials, accessibility, etc), discussions (engagement in chat, mailing lists, forums, etc), social media (followers and impressions in Twitter, LinkedIn, etc), or events (number of participants, demographics, etc).

Source: Enarx's Blog

Link: https://blog.enarx.dev/lfx-tools/

Mike Bursell

Title: Dr CloudLove, or how I learned to trust my CSP (not)
Author: Mike Bursell
Date: Tuesday, December 7, 2021, 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM

The Cloud is just somebody else’s computer. So when you run a workload on a cloud host, anyone who owns (or pwns) that system can look into it or change the data or event the application itself. You have no confidentiality or integrity protection from your Cloud Service Provider, rogue sysadmins or just anyone who compromises their machines. Confidential computing uses hardware-based trusted execution environment (e.g. Intel SGX, AMD SEV or Arm 9 Realms) to provide these protections, but it’s difficult to use and complex to understand.

This session will introduce the problem at a technical level, explain some of the solutions, and discuss why confidential computing is on its way – but not an easy fix (yet). Come and be amused, horrified, and excited; all in one presentation.

Source: SecurityWeekly Unlocked 2021

Link: https://events.securityweekly.com/unlocked2021

  • Ben
  • Nick
  • Shaun

Agenda

General discussion​

Outreachy​

Nick provided Ben and Shaun with a status of the Outreachy program and asked if they would be interested in getting involved. Ben suggested inviting current and past members of the Enarx project to be a guest speaker each week, sharing important insights with the Outreachy interns. Given the different timezones between guest speakers and interns, we'll likely have to create an asynchronous activity.

Nick Vidal

In a previous blog post, we outlined our vision for creating a Confidential Computing Fellowship. Today, we announce the first steps towards this vision, as we welcome three new interns to the Enarx project.

Last month, we received 10 Outreachy applicants. Of these, 9 were able to complete the first task successfully, which consisted of learning about WebAssembly, developing some small demos, and publishing one or more tutorials on GitHub. WebAssembly is key to the Enarx project, as this is how we deploy applications to the Cloud.

Source: Enarx's Blog

Link: https://blog.enarx.dev/welcome-outreachy-interns/

  • Ajay
  • Mandeep
  • Morgan
  • Nick
  • Paul
  • Shraddha

Agenda

General discussion​

Outreachy​

The Outreachy applicants had the opportunity to share with others their experience so far with the Enarx project: what they learned and what challenges they faced.

Results for the Outreachy program will be published next Monday (22nd), but Nick reassured everyone that, independent of the results, he would like to continue working with them.

A new group of WebAssembly enthusiasts is being formed at wasm.builders and Nick suggested for each one to publish their WebAssembly tutorials there for visibility. This will help them to build their portfolio and will open new opportunities.

Mike Bursell

Log entries and other error messages can be very useful, but they can also provide information to other parties - sometimes information which you’d prefer they didn’t have. This is particularly true when you are thinking about Confidential Computing: running applications or workloads in environments where you really want to protect the confidentiality and integrity of your application and its data.

Source: Enarx's Blog

Link: https://blog.enarx.dev/confidential-computing-logging-and-debugging/